Saturday, April 14, 2018

watchOS 4.3.1 suggests future support for third party watch faces →

Guilherme Rambo for 9to5Mac found some interesting code in watchOS 4.3.1 that hints at third party watch faces:

[…] A component of the NanoTimeKit framework, responsible for the watch faces, implements a developer tools server that’s probably designed to communicate with Xcode running on a Mac. One of its methods has a very interesting log message:

The log message in the image reads:

This is where the 3rd party face config bundle generation would happen

Not surprising that Apple may already have dormant support for this, but I’m wondering how they’d handle it. I think there are two schools of thought. On one hand, Apple Watch could use third party watch faces to spice things up a bit. It may even spur further interest in Apple Watch apps as a whole.

On the other hand, I’d say watch faces make up at least fifty percent of a watch’s brand. That’s any watch, not just a smart one. Apple is very careful and precise about any kind of customization with the potential to alter their branding. For instance, you can’t change the look of the home or lock screens on iOS. At most, you can change the wallpaper, and that’s it.

What I could see Apple doing is meeting us somewhere in the middle by opening up Apple Watch faces development to a small number of artists or institutions. In a sense, they’ve already done this with Nike and Hermès, the difference being those faces are only available with their associated unique hardware. I can see an extension of this kind of partnership to include accomplished artists, colleges, and the entertainment industry.

Imagine an official collegiate Apple Watch face, or maybe one by your favorite musical group. I know I’d buy a few. I would expect these faces to have equal functionality (complications what whatnot) as the stock ones.

I really don’t think Apple will let just anyone create a face for Apple Watch. It’s just too risky for their branding. If you’ve seen the some of the terrible third-party faces available for other smart watches, you wouldn’t want just anyone building Apple Watch faces either.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Apple offers extended three year repair program for iPad Pro Smart Keyboards →

Jordan Kahn for 9to5Mac:

Apple has launched a new extended repair program for its Smart Keyboard for iPad Pro, allowing customers experiencing certain issues with the product to receive repairs or replacements from Apple for three years after the device is purchased. Apple informed its retail staff and authorized service providers of the new policy in an internal memo obtained by 9to5Mac (pictured below).

The program covers the Smart Keyboard for both the 9.7-inch (Early 2016) and 12.9-inch (Late 2015) iPad Pro models, and applies to keyboards experiencing certain Functional Issues, including: sticking/repeating keys, sensor issues, problems with the keyboard’s magnetic connector, connection issues, and unresponsive keys.

I’m glad to hear this warranted a real repair program. The Smart Keyboard is great, but I have experienced the unresponsive keys issue a few times. It’s usually resolved by reconnecting the keyboard, but it’s annoying and breaks my flow. I should take mine in.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Wired’s ‘4 Best Smartphones’ list omits iPhone X

Wired published a list of ‘The 4 Best Smartphones Money Can Buy In 2018’ earlier today, crowning Google Pixel 2 as ‘the best overall’, while ommitting iPhone X.

Jeffrey Van Camp for Wired:

There are a lot of good reasons people may choose iOS over Android, but right now Google’s Pixel 2 and larger Pixel 2 XL are our picks for best overall smartphone. Google has made it super easy to buy its flagship phones unlocked, and all Pixel phones get security and software updates direct like clockwork.

Well kudos to Google for doing what Apple has always done. I still wouldn’t go near a Pixel phone. Google is way too early of a hardware manufacturer to be trusted (privacy reasons aside).

Jeffrey on the exclusion of iPhone X:

While we love the spiffy iPhone X, let’s get down to brass tacks: the cheaper iPhone 8 (and iPhone 8 Plus) are virtually identical in the ways that count.

Define ‘ways that count’. If he means specific components, then yes, there are core similarities. However, there are also core differences in terms of components (i.e. TrueDepth camera system and edge-to-edge screen). These components result in the individual user experiences of both models being radically different. There are even key UI elements that are different. If Jeffrey is saying these aren’t ‘ways that count’, then he’s missing the big picture. iPhone X isn’t just the future, it feels like the future. iPhone 8 is likely the last iteration of a tried-and-true 11 year old design. Let’s not pretend its going to be sticking around forever like the headphone jack. 1

While I think iPhone X is for everyone, not everyone may be ready for iPhone X. But to omit it completely is folly. In truth, iPhone 8/8 Plus and iPhone X all deserve to be on this list.


  1. Jeffrey also groans at the lack of a headphone jack across both Pixel and iPhone. 

I am jealous of the new (PRODUCT)RED iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus →

From the Apple Newsroom:

Cupertino, California — Apple today announced iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus (PRODUCT)RED Special Edition, the new generation of iPhone in a stunning red finish. Both phones sport a beautiful glass enclosure, now in red, with a matching aluminum band and a sleek black front. The special edition (PRODUCT)RED iPhone will be available to order online in select countries and regions tomorrow and in stores beginning Friday, April 13.

Seems like Apple is on an “official” cycle with these (PRODUCT)RED iPhone special editions. This year, though, the cover glass is the way it should always have been (black, not white).

Red and grey are my favorite colors, so I would kill for an iPhone X in this scheme, but I’m sure the investment wouldn’t pay off (literally) for Apple. Red is a polarizing color enough. Lumped together with the general hesitation for iPhone X alone, 1 you probably wouldn’t have a winning combination.

No, us iPhone X users are left with a new (PRODUCT)RED leather folio case, instead. Looks nice. Too bad I hate cases.


  1. You know, lack of home button, price, ‘the unfamiliar’. 

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Redesigned Mac Pro coming in 2019 →

Last year, in a move of unprecedented transparency, Apple invited a few journalists and bloggers to their campus to discuss the future of Mac Pro (as well as admit some mistakes in the current iteration’s design).

Matthew Panzarino from TechCrunch was recently invited back to be provided with more details, including their targeted year of release (2019). Here are the highlights from his meeting, focusing on how Apple’s new Pro Workflow Team is shaping the future of Mac Pro.

Tom Boger, senior director of Mac Hardware Product Marketing:

“We want to be transparent and communicate openly with our pro community, so we want them to know that the Mac Pro is a 2019 product. It’s not something for this year.” In addition to transparency for pro customers, there’s also a larger fiscal reason behind it.

Makes sense. It wouldn’t be cool for organizations to spend tens of thousands of dollars upgrading to iMac Pros, only for a potentially more desirable Mac Pro to be close behind.

On Apple’s ‘Pro Workflow Team’:

Now, it’s a year later and Apple has created a team inside the building that houses its pro products group. It’s called the Pro Workflow Team, and they haven’t talked about it publicly before today. The group is under John Ternus and works closely with the engineering organization.

On how Apple is capturing workflows of professional creatives:

So Apple decided to go a step further and just begin hiring these creatives directly into Apple. Some of them on a contract basis but many full-time, as well. These are award-winning artists and technicians that are brought in to shoot real projects (I saw a bunch of them walking by in Apple Park toting kit for an on-premise outdoor shoot). They then put the hardware and software through their paces and point out sticking points that could cause frustration and friction among pro users.

Now this is commitment. This isn’t just a partnership or collaboration. Apple is paying these people for their time — the people who do this type of work for a living. I can only imagine the outcomes will be magnificent for everyone (non-pros included).

On fixing issues discovered during workflow capture:

This kind of workflow analysis has enabled Apple to find and fix problems that won’t be solved by throwing more hardware at them. An in-depth analysis of how workflow is affected by the whole stack of hardware and software has, Ternus says, helped them to really understand the pain points. He stresses that it’s not just Apple’s applications that they’re testing and working to help make better. Third-party relationships on this are very important to them and the workflow team is helping to fix their problems faster too.

On making the new Mac Pro modular by design:

“As we said a year ago, working on modular was inherently a modular system and in looking at our customers and their workflows obviously that’s a real need for our customers and that’s the direction we’re going,” says Boger.

“Well, it’s a need for some of them,” adds Ternus. “I want to be clear that the work that we’re doing as a part of the workflow team is across everything. It’s super relevant for MacBook Pros, it’s super relevant for iMacs and iMac Pros and in the end I think it helps us in dialogue with customers to figure out what are the right systems for you. […]

Translation: all our Macs are great, even if you don’t need modularity.

Matthew’s comments on Apple’s strategy here:

[…] In this case it’s heartening to see that there is a straight line between the pros that Apple has hired, the conversations it’s having with contractors who come in to contribute and proactive action taken on products. The work of the Pro Workflow Team is directly affecting the development of the new Mac Pro. And the iMac Pro, Final Cut Pro and macOS.

And:

[…] As depressing as it has been to see professionals believe that Apple was getting ready to give them up, I find this an interesting and exciting thing to watch. It is very, very hard for a company like Apple — whose reputation is built on myth building — to admit that it was mistaken. And it’s even harder to then change course with billions of dollars’ worth of revenue at stake.[…]

Overall, this sounds like excellent news for professional creatives. As I said above, regular consumers can only stand to benefit from the Pro Workflow Team’s finding as well, as software tweaks may trickle down. As for me, I just can’t wait to see what the thing looks like. 1 Even though Apple is feeding us a lot of details ahead of time (for them anyway), I think this will give the grand reveal even more intrigue. To quote Phil Schiller: “Can’t innovate anymore, my ass!”


  1. Hopefully not like a trash can. 

Apple hires John Giannandrea, Google’s AI chief →

Jack Nicas and Cade Metz for The New York Times:

Apple has hired Google’s chief of search and artificial intelligence, John Giannandrea, a major coup in its bid to catch up to the artificial intelligence technology of its rivals.

Apple said on Tuesday that Mr. Giannandrea will run Apple’s “machine learning and A.I. strategy,” and become one of 16 executives who report directly to Apple’s chief executive, Timothy D. Cook.

And:

“Our technology must be infused with the values we all hold dear,” Mr. Cook said Tuesday morning in an email to staff members obtained by The New York Times. “John shares our commitment to privacy and our thoughtful approach as we make computers even smarter and more personal.”

Now this is a huge hire. Apple must have ponied up big time, but I’m sure a guy like Giannandrea wouldn’t jump ship only because of money. Apple must have let on just enough about what he’s going to be working on for it to be worth it.

The note about privacy is a stark difference between how Google and Apple handle user data. The perception of Apple as lacking in AI/ML is mostly attributed to their hard privacy stances, whereas Google is more cavalier with user data. It’s going to be a hard problem for Apple and Giannandrea to solve, but all good things come with time. Apple is essentially saying we can have exceptional AI/ML and keep our privacy. That’s exactly what we need.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Bloomberg: Apple switching Macs from Intel to ARM in 2020 →

Ian King and Mark Gurman for Bloomberg:

Apple Inc. is planning to use its own chips in Mac computers beginning as early as 2020, replacing processors from Intel Corp., according to people familiar with the plans.

The initiative, code named Kalamata, is still in the early developmental stages, but comes as part of a larger strategy to make all of Apple’s devices — including Macs, iPhones, and iPads — work more similarly and seamlessly together, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing private information. The project, which executives have approved, will likely result in a multi-step transition.

On the benefits:

By using its own chips, Apple would be able to more tightly integrate new hardware and software, potentially resulting in systems with better battery life — similar to iPads, which use Apple chips.

And:

As part of the larger initiative to make Macs work more like iPhones, Apple is working on a new software platform, internally dubbed Marzipan, for release as early as this year that would allow users to run iPhone and iPad apps on Macs, Bloomberg News reported last year.

What It Means

This is huge news if true! Us Apple diehards and developers have been speculating for a long time as to the likelihood of this switch. In fact, it has been assumed that Apple has been testing ARM-based Macs for years now, evaluating their feasibility.

It makes sense, since Apple has increasingly been designing and making their own ARM-based silicon much to our benefit. To name the chips to date:

  • A-Series System On A Chip for iOS devices (mainly CPU, GPU, Secure Enclave, Neural Engine)
  • M-Series Motion Co-Processor for iOS devices
  • S-Series System In A Package for Apple Watch (CPU, GPU, Motion)
  • T-Series Co-Processor for Touch Bar Macs
  • W-Series Processor for wireless devices (AirPods, BeatsX, also Apple Watch)

As you can see, Apple has become quite the expert with ARM-based chipsets. Also supposedly in the works is a chip to handle AI tasks — something Siri can only stand to benefit from.

There are many pros to using ARM, as noted in the article. Better battery life and a shared code base for development are huge ones. Plus, Apple would no longer be beholden to Intel’s timeline and delays for new chips, which has caused Apple major pain points. If you’re worried what kind of headache we’re in for if and when the day comes, I’d look at Apple’s track record. They have handled similarly large transitions with relative grace, like when they switched from PowerPC to Intel.

No Easy Task

Make no mistake. Switching to ARM will be no easy task. There will be a multitude of items to address.

Boot Camp, for instance, which allows for dual-booting Windows and macOS, will need to be adjusted. The only reason it works now is because of Apple’s switch to Intel and the x86-64 architecture. Microsoft does have a version of Windows for ARM coming out, but it’s seriously lacking. Unless Apple has some crazy emulation magic up their sleeves, Windows fans may be forced to use this version for now.

Same goes for applications. Apps will need to be adjusted and compiled for ARM, but I’m sure Apple will do everything in their power to make it as seamless as possible for developers.

This news comes at a time where Apple’s software quality is largely being questioned, due to bug-ridden releases in 2017. In fact, Apple is expected to announce new versions of iOS and macOS at WWDC this year focusing on quality and performance in lieu of major new features. This can only be a good thing if they have a massive transition planned down the line.

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Kuo predicts Apple Watch Series 4 will have bigger screen, new design →

Benjamin Mayo for 9to5Mac:

With a launch in the third quarter of 2018, Ming-Chi Kuo says the new watches will have a 15% larger display. All Watches to date come in 38 mm or 42 mm screen sizes.

The analyst (who has one of the better track records of accuracy when it comes to Apple rumors) does not say whether the overall chassis will grow in proportion.

It is possible the new form factor incorporates thinner bezels, which would see the Apple Watch Series 4 feature a larger display without making the overall product larger. The report does mention a larger battery capacity which would suggest that is not going to be the case.

I completely forgot to write about this earlier in the week. Slimmer bezels are an easy way to make the screen bigger without increasing the physical body size. I would love to have more screen real estate on my wrist. This would open up new opportunities for Apple Watch and app developers. 1 I bet this is exactly what we’ll see in the new iteration, hopefully with an always-on watch face!

As I said in my Series 3 review, the current design is starting to get a little bit stale, and a new dot crown color isn’t going to cut it this time around. Less bezels/bigger screen would alter the design for the better (think iPhone X). Some folks also think Apple Watch is a little chunky, and they’re not wrong, but many mechanical watches are as chunky if not chunkier. If anything, I feel the rounded rectangle shape makes it seem chunkier than it really is. In other words, I personally don’t care for Apple to make it thinner.

One final thought: I still don’t think we’ll see a round watch face just yet (if ever). While I would love to see the design itself, it just doesn’t make sense from a UI/UX perspective. I wonder if it’s a hurdle we’ll ever surpass.


  1. Anything to reignite the stagnate Apple Watch dev community. 

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Key Notes: Apple’s Field Trip event

As if you didn’t hear already, Apple announced a bunch of stuff today focused on education. With an upgraded iPad and new software, Apple presents its renewed plans for tech in the classroom.

An important distinction to make is that the new iPad is not a ‘School Edition’ iPad, if you will. There may very well never be a specific edition aimed at schools until if and when adoption rates spike along with radical education changes. Today’s event is framed as educational, but when it comes to iPad itself, the truth is that it will also be bought by millions of regular people and non-educational organizations. This product still has to be universal. It’s an iPad for the masses that also has benefits for schools, one of which is a price reduction.

Now, the new software on the other hand … that’s where the education piece really comes into play.

Read on

Friday, March 23, 2018

BOFA: Apple to release ‘foldable’ phone in 2020 →

Tae Kim for CNBC:

Bank of America Merrill Lynch said the smartphone maker is working with its Asian partners on a foldable phone.

“We expect the iPhones this fall to be largely unchanged for the OLED versions although size changes have proved to be a catalyst in the past,” analyst Wamsi Mohan wrote in a note to clients Friday. “Our checks also suggest that Apple is working with suppliers on a foldable phone (that potentially could double up as a tablet) for launch in 2020.”

Yeah, okay Bank of America. Two years seems way too soon for this kind of product. Although, I think this could be where we are headed. Instead of reverting back to the old flip phone days, imagine a perfectly normal iPhone that could transform into an iPad mini whenever needed, with negligible bulk. And people harp on Apple’s obsession for thinness … just wait until we reap the rewards.