Wednesday, May 9, 2018

The joy of Micro.blog

Long-time developer Manton Reece created Micro.blog last year, a network of independent microblogs based on the foundations of the open Internet. I’ll let the front page of the site explain itself:

Today’s social networks are broken. Ads are everywhere. Hate and harassment are too common. Fake news spreads unchecked.

There’s a better way: a network of independent microblogs. Short posts like tweets but on your own web site that you control.

Micro.blog is a safe community for microblogs. A timeline to follow friends and discover new posts. Hosting built on open standards.

I joined a few weeks back and am really attracted to the simplicity of it. There are no frivolous practices, unnecessary gimmicks, or anything like that. The content is yours and yours alone. What you see is what you get. It reminds me of the earlier days of the Internet, where everything was more whimsical and less threatening than the current status quo. When it comes to free services, we have sadly come to expect a gimmick, trade-off, or worse in exchange for our data. Micro.blog’s opposition to this idea simply makes it a joy to use.

Upon signing up, you can either have them host a blog for you for only $5 a month or you can publish to your own site, while content is mirrored to your Micro.blog profile via RSS. Taking it one step further, Micro.blog can also cross-post individual RSS feeds to Twitter and Facebook, eliminating the need for third-party services to do so. 1

Since I already have my own blog, I opted to publish everything solely here. It took quite a bit of adjustments with WordPress, but I have my Micro.blog posts displayed here on the site exactly how I want them. You’ll always find my latest status posted in the sidebar, right under the One-Tech Mind logo. Go ahead and click on the ‘Microblog’ header for my full stream of status updates. I am @Starman on Micro.blog, so you can follow me there, or you can subscribe to the RSS feed of my status updates directly. These status updates are not present on the main site feeds, since I know not everyone will want to see these in their RSS reader.

Manton’s team hasn’t stopped there, either. They recently introduced microcast support, a straightforward and open way to create and publish a bite-sized podcast.

There are also quite a few apps in which to use Micro.blog with. The main ones are Micro.blog for posts, Wavelength for microcasts, and Sunlit for photos. There are even quite a few third-party apps that work with Micro.blog. In fact, a new one came out today called Icro, and it shows a ton of promise.

While Twitter threatens to remove critical features third-party developers have used to build their apps, Micro.blog’s attitude on the matter is the complete opposite. Because of this and the reasons I mentioned above, I am really looking forward to what Micro.blog and the community creates moving forward.

More info on Micro.blog.


  1. This is free with a $5 hosted micro blog. Otherwise, it’s a $2 per month add-on.